The Twitter Staff Handbook

Employment law tweets

With rapid changes to the workplace, such as the newly-emerging gig-economy (how do you define ‘worker’ and ’employee’?) and the recent media stories about company dress codes and modern-day slavery, there are plenty of updates that are needed to be made in staff handbooks.

Apart from the issue of whether or not what’s in the handbook forms part of the contract, one of the main problems with staff handbooks is that they don’t exactly read like a thriller.  No one wants to sit and read a stuffy book about rules and regulations. And typically, many staff handbooks are chucked into a desk drawer and forgotten about.

However, that may be a mistake. When written well, there’s a lot of useful information in staff handbooks – from how to raise a grievance to how to apply for a sabbatical – and the documents can work well for employers too. They’re a way to set out company procedures and ethics as well as employee rights and responsibilities.

So in a bid to liven them up, a team of social media savvy employment solicitors and HR professionals have put together the EmploymentSolicitor.com Twitter Staff Handbook.

Can you really have a water-tight policy on whistle-blowing in 140 characters? Or rely on the fact you used an #EqualityAct2010 hashtag in court? Of course not. However, what these tweets do is quickly remind us of what we need to know in an engaging, succinct way.

Can you think of any others? Tweet us your staff handbook policies! We’ll update this piece to include the best of them. Please send them to @empsolicitor or use the #staffhandbook hashtag.

Ian Carey, director of Careys Law gets us started with a nifty policy on whistle-blowing:

It’s also important to include corruption and bribery says @Careys_Law 

How about equal opportunities? Here’s Jon Curtis, a partner at @IC_Solicitors:

For an anti-bullying policy Jon Curtis, a partner at @IC_Solicitors suggests…

Sajida Hussain, employment law and business immigration solicitor has a spot on health and safety policy:

 

Also @DACBEmployment puts disciplinary brilliantly:

There’s more!

How about respect for others in the workplace? Kate Griffiths-Lambeth, HR director at Charles Stanley has one:

For a social media policy, how about this from the team at Squire Patton Boggs @SPB_EmpLaw?

 

 

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